Platypuses live in Australia's freshwater and brackish estuaries. They have a duck's bill, a beaver's tail, and otter's feet, yet they're mammals. Platypuses dig a waterside burrow to lay their eggs, which hatch 10 days later. 

Platypus

The most prevalent mouse is the house mouse. Outdoors, they dig tunnels and line them with dried grass, although they also burrow in found spots. Indoors, they try to burrow in walls, pillows, and attics.

House Mouse

Each of the eight species of pangolins, which are distributed over two continents, faces serious threats and is classified as either Vulnerable or Critically Endangered. These scaly animals are nocturnal by nature and require big, deep burrows in which to sleep and raise their young.

Pangolin

Eastern Australia's funnel web spider. From its burrow, it builds a funnel-shaped web. Long trip lines attached to the web allow the spider to detect predators or prey without departing. Poisonous funnel web spiders exist.

Funnel Web Spider

Weasels have thin bodies, narrow heads, long necks, and short legs, which may have developed to travel readily through burrow networks especially rodent burrows, which are their primary diet. Mustela weasels live in a range of habitats, including deserts, grasslands, tundra, and woodlands.

Weasel

A meerkat is a mongoose found in Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Mozambique. In arid environments like plains and grasslands, they dwell in tunnels dug by other animals, notably ground squirrels. These enormous burrows feature a dozen or more exits, sleeping places, and toilets.

Meerkats

A meerkat is a mongoose found in Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Mozambique. In arid environments like plains and grasslands, they dwell in tunnels dug by other animals, notably ground squirrels. These enormous burrows feature a dozen or more exits, sleeping places, and toilets.

Rat

Nearly all ant species build sophisticated underground networks with several burrows and rooms for different purposes. Georgia Tech scientists found that ants' burrowing tactics vary by soil type, excavating deeper tunnels in clay and fine-grained soils with higher moisture content.

Ants

Prairie dog communities are often identifiable by the mounds of soil near their burrow entrances. Their underground colonies contain 30-50 entrances and exits per acre. A specific lookout perch near an exit hole helps them identify predators including the black-footed ferret, coyotes, eagles, foxes, and bobcats.

Prairie Dog

Burrowing owls dig their own burrows or take over those of prairie dogs, squirrels, or tortoises. They may also nest in PVC pipes or buckets. These owls use their burrows to store dozens or even hundreds of mouse carcasses for their brooding phase.

Burrowing Owl

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